Going PRO - some questions


#1

Hey guys so I’m pretty sure I want to go PRO but I have a couple of questions. What are the first steps? I know I need to pick a PRO and register my tracks with them…Do we use our real names or producing names? Is there a difference between Composer and Publisher? Does every track I ever make from now on have to be registered with the PRO…even stuff I don’t sell on AudioJungle?

Also do I register first and then switch my status on AudioJungle or do I first switch status on AudioJungle and then register?

What are some cons of going PRO?

Thank You.


#2

Same questions!..and also…will this decision influence the sales!!!:slight_smile:


#3

I’ll take a stab at this from my experience and/or approach.[quote=“KabbalisticVillage, post:1, topic:79335”]
What are the first steps? I know I need to pick a PRO and register my tracks with them…Do we use our real names or producing names?
[/quote]
I use my real name as the Composer and I use Midnight Snap Music for the Publisher (the idea being I may want to publish someone else’s work in the future if the opportunity should present itself). I believe there is a way to use an alias or producer name for either. I see that one of our highest selling Audio Jungle authors is registered by his “logo” name. [quote=“KabbalisticVillage, post:1, topic:79335”]
Is there a difference between Composer and Publisher?
[/quote]

Yes. You should really study this from the PRO you are registering with. It can be confusing at first. There is potentially separate Royalties from being a Composer and Publisher. If you are the only composer you have a right to 100% of the Composer Royalties of a particular registered track. If you are also registered as a sole publisher of the track, you have a right to 100% of the Publisher Royalties. However, there are probably different ways that other publishers can get involved with your composed works that may open the door for them to have a percentage cut of the Publisher Royalties for a specific performance/broadcast use of the track. Others here may have more experience to highlight what those scenarios are. Note that you don’t have to register as a Publisher. [quote=“KabbalisticVillage, post:1, topic:79335”]
Does every track I ever make from now on have to be registered with the PRO…even stuff I don’t sell on AudioJungle?
[/quote]

No, you don’t have to register everything. You can register the tracks of your choice with the PRO. Note that you must show your PRO affiliation on every track you upload to AJ - that doesn’t mean you have to register it. [quote=“KabbalisticVillage, post:1, topic:79335”]
Also do I register first and then switch my status on AudioJungle or do I first switch status on AudioJungle and then register?
[/quote]
I think you should first signup with a PRO before switching your status. This way you will have figured out what PRO, whether composer only or also as a publisher, and what name to use etc. This is information you will need to have when you upload a new track. [quote=“KabbalisticVillage, post:1, topic:79335”]
What are some cons of going PRO?
[/quote]

Cons:

  • Depending on the PRO, there are fees to signing up.
  • More administrative work to register your tracks with the PRO

Perhaps others can chime in on this, but that’s all I can think of

Pros:

  • Big plus for additional potential Royalties for Broadcast uses of the track

Lastly, I initially had a concern about how listing my PRO affiliation might impact sales. Based on my experience here, it has not impacted my sales at all. I have enjoyed a steady (albeit modest) climb in sales since showing my PRO affiliation. Perhaps others can comment about their experience with this as well.

I hope this helps. Happy Holidays!


#4

great answers. Thank You.


#5

One more question - do logos and idents also get registered? Thanks.


#6

Note that the PRO of your choice may have different rules or policies.

Some PRO demand that you register all your music with them, while others do not. So check their policies first.

As for the cons, I would add that in some specific cases, it could mean that your buyer is asked to pay royalties by your PRO (when they were hoping/thought they wouldn’t have to). Now, I know that some authors strongly disagree with this, but I’ve seen it happened first hand (and I think denial is never helping).

I still think going PRO is the only viable way for us authors.


#7

Thanks for answering. What do you mean when they ask the buyer to pay Royalties? Doesn’t PRO only work for broadcast licenses and up? Or am I confused?


#8

PROs have nothing to do with AJ licenses. PROs collect royalties for public performances. These can be TV/radio broadcasts, Internet videos (Youtube pays out a certain amount to PROs), as well as public venues and live events.

In most cases, your buyer is not the broadcaster (broad sense of the term), so they won’t be affected at all. But there are specific cases where your buyer is the broadcaster and may be required to pay royalties themselves.

I have two examples:

  1. I used to work with a small theater company. They would produce around 5 plays each year. They would have to pay royalties to SACEM (French PRO). They had a set budget for this that would allow them to use a limited number of tracks with a limited run-time. Since they had a limited budget, they were careful not to go over the agreed upon run-time, as they would have to pay extra if they did. They turned to RF tracks to keep their royalties budget on check. Recently they were surprised to learn that they still had to pay royalties for one of these tracks, and went over budget.

  2. A family member is an orphanage director. At the end of each year, orphans and educators would produce a show involving horses and epic music. At first my uncle would use music form well known films. Then SACEM came knocking on his door and gave him a big fine. I advised him to go the Audiojungle way a few years ago, which worked great for them. Now that AJ may be PRO, he does not dare use AJ music anymore.

These are anecdotic of course. But since I have these two examples that close to home, I’m sure there must be plenty more occurrences.


#9

Amazing answers. Thank you.