What is the Difference Between 8-Bit and 16-Bit even 32 bit in Photoshop?


#1

Can you tell me about that? :slight_smile:

Thanks


#2

These shows the date transfer rate in various OS. I mean in 8 Bit, only 8 bits are transferred at a time. Similarly for the others too. This determines the speed of the system. Among these, 32 bit will be faster.


For eg: You have got 100 oranges to be transfered to a particular location. In 8 bit system, you can carry only 8 oranges at a time. But in 32 bit system, you could take 32 oranges :) This will do the work more easily and quickly. The same thing is happening in 8/16/32/64 bit systems. More bit rate, more will be the processing speed of the system. So in the case of Photoshop, it will work more efficiently and smoothly and filter effects can be applied very easily!


#3

sorry myjilson, but this is absolutely wrong.

8bit/16bit/32bit in image quality is the size of the space allocated to each channel for describing colors.

You can learn more here:


#4

This possible for Printing using CMYK? Any different between 8 bit and 16 bit (when 32 bit not available for CMYK, only RGB), when we compare each other after printing is done?


#5

From what I understand it is just not relevant. Printed inks do not have “bit depth”. They are inks.

CMYK does not allow you to reproduce many colors which monitors can show.


#6
ramijames said

sorry myjilson, but this is absolutely wrong.

8bit/16bit/32bit in image quality is the size of the space allocated to each channel for describing colors.

You can learn more here:

Exactly!


#7
ramijames said

From what I understand it is just not relevant. Printed inks do not have “bit depth”. They are inks.

CMYK does not allow you to reproduce many colors which monitors can show.

So, 8 bits for the best?


#8

Yes! 8 Bit is standard. Some filters will not work with 16 bit and 32 bit


#9

But soft gradient will look MUCH MUCH better on 16bit or 32bit.


#10

16bit color-depth is often use in post-prodution of rendered graphics.
With 3DS Max I create not the final render image. I render various elements of the scene (shadows, reflection, ambient, global illumination, …) in one step as single images with 16-bit color depth. These 16bit images are then re-assembled in Photoshop as layers. This allows image variations which otherwise consume more render time.


#11
canimalition said
ramijames said

From what I understand it is just not relevant. Printed inks do not have “bit depth”. They are inks.

CMYK does not allow you to reproduce many colors which monitors can show.

So, 8 bits for the best?

Yes, 8bit depth is the correct depth for doing print work in CMYK color space.


#12
ramijames said

sorry myjilson, but this is absolutely wrong.

8bit/16bit/32bit in image quality is the size of the space allocated to each channel for describing colors.

You can learn more here:

Sorry mate, actually, I didn’t read the question well! I didn’t noticed the ‘in Photoshop’ clearly :wink: