Seeking Some Advice From Filmmakers


#1

Hello,

I just tried uploading my first video, but it was rejected. “Unfortunately we could not accept this item for sale on the marketplace due to the large amount of noise/grain visible in the shot, which severely degrades the quality of the clip.”

I deleted my other uploads as I think they will all have the same issue.

I’ve uploaded the video to YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5drsksqWKgA&feature=youtu.be

I’m using a Canon 600D and a 50mm 1.8 lens. It was shot with the ISO at 160.

Any advice on how to reduce this grain in the future? Feel free to critique my video. I’m new to this and would love some feedback.

Thanks in advance!
Adam.


#2

you can use Denoiser, it will help you.
Also, i advice you to clean up reflections.


#3

Thanks for the response :slight_smile:

Will check it out!

Adam.


#4

It’s hard to advise with youtube. It might be noise or compression grain. I usually use “Remove Grain” in After Effects with temporal filtering but sometimes it’s good to add some noise back before the render.

Also depend on scene dynamic range you can try to shot with ISO 200-400 or even 800-1600 with flat Cinestyle which may have cleaner result after color correction.

Best Regards,
Andrey


#5

What I’m seeing in the clip you linked are compression artefacts, not noise.

Noise is generally an artefact of having too little signal to noise ratio… a result of underexposing - or under-lighting and compensating with high gain (i.e. a high ISO).

When you shoot, use more light and a lower ISO. When you compress, learn about compression - it’s a bit of an artform - and experiment with different compression settings.

That said, for film material, the Canon 600D is a pretty low quality camera. I have one myself. It’s kind of fun for shooting outside in broad daylight, but under less than perfect lighting conditions it quickly gets very noisy. Perhaps down to the small chip size, and definitely down to the fact that the only recording format is H.264.

If you’re serious about stock footage, I’d consider getting a camera that can record uncompressed. There are some reasonably priced models out there these days. Otherwise, consider hiring a professional camera.