Removing Repeated 'Beep' Sound


#1

Hey all, has anybody ever used Waves Restoration plugins (or other plugins) to remove a repeated noise from a WAV file?

I’m not trying to get around paying for demo software or anything :). One of my colleagues at my day job recorded a web cast with licensed software (not sure what) but apparently used some “practice” setting that recorded an annoying beep every 30 seconds. So I was going to see if I could do something with the WAV to remove the beeps without messing up the rest of the audio too much. I’ve never done this before and was curious if anyone else out there had.


#2

Hi,

never removed a repeating noise from a wav with Restoration plugins but Izotope RX4 should do the job, when your restauration plugins wont do it… or ban the “beep” with a nice decent X crossfade… :wink:

regards

Sebastian


#3

This should be possible without interfering with the rest of the audio too much. The first thing I would do is to find the exact frequency of the beep ( I’m assuming it’s a simple sine wave beep) and then EQ just that frequency out. This shouldn’t affect the audio too much as it is only attenuating a narrow frequency band. The other option is to use a noise removal plugin in an audio editing program such as Audacity. You simply select a part of the audio where the beep is playing ( preferably on its own) and then the plugin will attempt to filter out any audio that matches that wave pattern or frequency. You can then dial in how much of the audio you want to take out (ie the strength of the attenuation) but beware of side effects such as accidentally removing other parts of your song using similar frequencies. I’ve had varying success with this method but hopefully it will do the trick for you.

Anyway that’s my advice. Hope it helps :smiley:


#4

If this is simple sine wave, Sound Forge should do the work. It’s cheaper than RX but also you could do it using demo version I think :slight_smile:


#5

Eunoia is right: RX4 is free for a 10-day trail…


#6

+1 Izotope RX will kill it no problem.

Also +1 as JamesV said if it’s a pure sine wave beep you should be able to do it pretty well with a standard EQ notch filter (super high Q, cut all the way) at the right frequency, simply applied across the whole audio file without any noticeable degradation. 1kHz sinewave is pretty standard for these kind of beeps in my experience, but if not you should be able to easily sweep the filter around to find it.


#7

Sweet! Thanks for all the answers and advice!

I tried a few things. Waves didn’t really have good tools for this in their restoration package - mainly they did a decent job with constant noise or hum, or well defined clicks. I did run a spectrum analyzer and the sound was mostly defined right around 475 hz, so I tried a couple of different EQ plugs but without too much success - I could lessen the edge of the beep a bit but not enough to make it worthwhile.

I also tried RX4 and this was the best option. You could see a well defined rectangle where the beep was in the spectrum, and just cutting out that entire band made it almost acceptable. Unfortunately the demo doesn’t let you save, and I didn’t feel like springing for the full version for this one thing. But I was impressed enough with the tool to maybe pick it up the next time there’s a decent sale on iZotope plugins.

Thank you!


#8

A noise reduction in adobe audition is quite effective. It’s good to have pure beep sound and load it as noise profile, then apply noise reduction to these parts. Usually beeps are narrow in frequency spectrum and there’s a chance to remove them almost inaudibly.


#9
FxProSound said

A noise reduction in adobe audition is quite effective. It’s good to have pure beep sound and load it as noise profile, then apply noise reduction to these parts. Usually beeps are narrow in frequency spectrum and there’s a chance to remove them almost inaudibly.

This x 10.000


#10

Thanks! I’ll check that out and see how it compares to the RX4 demo.