colour issue when uploading to vimeo.


#1

Im having a problem uploading videos to vimeo, the colours seem to be offset the darks darker and the whites blown out.

im pretty sure the problem lies with vimeo converting my video from 0-255 to a 16-235 colour scope.

Is there anyway to export from after effects that will maintain the correct colours when i upload them. i have already tried keying out unsafe colours using the broadcast colours effect as well as setting the levels on an adjustment layer to output within the correct colour range however im still left with the same problem.

any ideas?


#2

Check out the “compression guidelines”:https://vimeo.com/help/compression


#3

Vimeo certainly converts the videos that you upload, so its almost impossible to get the exact color range of an uncompressed quicktime,
The easiest way for me is to export an Animation codec from after effects, then open the file in Quicktime Pro 7 (or adobe media encoder) and use the x264 codec which you can download free here:

Its a bit better for me when it comes to gammas and such, there are more options to fiddle with, and the file size is usually smaller than the regular h.264 -
give it a go and see how it works…


#4
markburbery said

Im having a problem uploading videos to vimeo, the colours seem to be offset the darks darker and the whites blown out.

im pretty sure the problem lies with vimeo converting my video from 0-255 to a 16-235 colour scope.

Is there anyway to export from after effects that will maintain the correct colours when i upload them. i have already tried keying out unsafe colours using the broadcast colours effect as well as setting the levels on an adjustment layer to output within the correct colour range however im still left with the same problem.

any ideas?

Unlikely to be a 16/235 to full range conversion. Much more likely to be the famous Quicktime gamma problem. You can balance it out to an extent as you compress.

The gamma problem is unpredictable. It depends what format you’re compressing from and which format you’re compressing to and which version of Quicktime (and potentially the transcoded format player) you’re using.

The trick is to experiment with compensating the gamma during compression until you find a method that works for you.