Buzz words

I don’t know, if we already have a thread with buzz words. If yes, ignore it. If not, I would start with a few ones, which I read very often in song names (and sometimes I ask myself what the track has to do with this word).
Unfortunately I don’t know a customer of AJ and I’m really interested, how customers search for music on AJ. Are they really jumping on an endless list with song names like “Inspiring Piano Music”? If yes, what do they expect then? Which kind of inspiration will this song transport? Which purpose will this insiration fulfill?
And for what do we have tags and a description field? Do the customers read descriptions?
I really want to know, where I should put my efforts. Makes an imaginative song name sense or is it wasted time? Make detailed song descriptions sense, or they are also wasted time?
I’m curious, what you’re thinking about.

Inspiring
Technology
Uplifting
Emotional
Motivation
Epic
Corporate
Upbeat

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If I had to guess then yeah “Inspiring Piano Music” is probably a popular search term. I think the reason for this is that most people have the idea of the style of music they need for their project, and that’s what they end up searching for. So you end up with terms like Uplifting, Motivational, Emotional being very popular search terms.

Imaginative song names seem to me to be less likely to show up in search results just because if you call your song “Flower of Life” or something like that, it might be a great name that perfectly fits the song but no one is going to type that into a search bar.

I don’t really know about the relevance of tags and description keywords vs. the title… but it seems like whatever you type in the search bar, all the top results are tracks that have the exact search terms in the title.

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Hello Daydreamz-Studios.
Maybe I can contribute something to this thread based on my short experience here.
Of course I think that the musical quality of the tracks is the most important part to sell here but I think that all market strategies must be taken into account and for me, naming the item is one of the most important.
I have observed that in any category where tens of thousands of articles appear in audiojungle, if you put the words of my titles in the search engine, my article appears among the first.
So I make an effort to put myself in the customer’s shoes and think. What would I write here?
So summarizing, I try to find three or four words that define my article according to the following concepts.
1 Style.
2 Instrumentation.
3 Emotion.
4 Scene.
This is how I do it and I think it helps customers find the item they are looking for.

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Description does matter and it’s where AJ pulls a lot of key terms from, tags make a difference but not a huge one in my experience. Title definitely seems to be the most important though and making sure you stand out in your category/niche is really important to make sure you show up in search results.

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Thank you guys for sharing you opinions. I was reading the AJ guide for item naming again and noticed, that I was completely wrong until now. The guide provides exactly what you wrote. I’ve no idea why I was so misleaded on this topic. I’ll go thru my items now and rename them if it makes sense.
Glad, that I was asking for this detail and many thanks to you for the clearance.

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Hey guys, sorry to bring this up again, but here’s an actual post from a customer in the customer-forum for audio.

AJ should have more attention to the item naming conventions.
And as I said before, customers are annoyed and tired of what they find on AJ. This is also a big reason for the sales drop. If customers do not find quickly, what they want, they simply go to the competitors.

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@Daydreamz-Studios . I think we are asking the wrong question. The real question is : Can we rely on tags ? Is SEO able to be enough descriptive and working as intended without beeing hilariously descriptive in the title? If a customer is looking for a 'inspiring, grotesque, happy piano, and the title of the song is ‘eastern pigs’ , but the tags along the track are consistent and descriptive, why it doesn’t show in the search results? Or it is placed on the last pages. Someone suggested here on board that the track should have a creative short title, and a bit longer descriptive one. Eg, Eastern Pigs - Inspiring, horrorful, cheering piano. Maybe some SEO expert author may jump in and enlight us.

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Yes, you’re totally right. If the search does not provide the wanted results based on tags, then no wonder about the item names. However, if they do nothing about this topic, we’ll loose more and more customers.

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@Daydreamz-Studios . Yes. That is the dilemma. I kinda prefer to use creative names for my tracks. And it went pretty well since now…ish. Somehow i use to choose best of both worlds. Something that describes the genre and a creative name which leads you towards the vibe of the track. But that is pretty debatable. It does not work for any genre.If i release a corporate track and try to find a creative name like ’ The monday brief ’ i would lmfao. to be honest.

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@Soundtrickz , I don’t understand the whole system here and why it doesn’t work.

  • We have a category
    If I upload a song, I choose a category, which clearly should fit to the song. Maybe the reviewer should have also a look to the chosen category. It’s not a good idea (from a sales perspective) to put a happy latin song in the Action/Adventure category (it’s exaggerated, I know)
  • We have a HTML description
  • We have tags
    30 tags for each song

And despite of all these things the search doesn’t work properly. In my opinion you made a good example. Why not naming a song “The monday morning brief” if the music transports clear this mood? If the song is in the correct “Corporate” genre and the tags are proper set (like briefing, meeting, monday, morning, business, boss etc.), this song name could be a good addition to describe, what the customer can expect and for what the song is intended. Or do I misunderstand, what you meant?

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I do not have a long experience on AJ ( or RF) by any means. My background is mainstream, advertising and sync music. But in my short experience ,here on AJ, i have seen highly experienced authors with important achievements appealing to the same name tagging. This,that,the,a corporate, epic, etc. I believe they have tested this and its not a common practice out of laziness. As i previously said. It may work for some genres, like corporate and so called epic.( just because there are some orchestral libraries involved these are under no circumstances epic or cinematic cues, and they will never be) Ostinatos , horns and big a## drums does not make it epic. But customers asked for that, so someone have to make them, and sell them. Market has been changed. So i believe customers who need some background music for their powerpoint presentation dont really care about the name of the track they are using. So for these genre , generic names may be working. But somehow this practice became the normality. And when abnormality tends to replace normality, things are bad. Envato should do something , really fast, otherways AJ will become a place with millions of depersonalisated musical backgrounds made by robots for the robots.

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I know one thing - you need to enter in the name :
“UpbeatInspiringUpliftingMotivateCorporate” etc.
and you will be happy.
Here is an example of a search with the word “Inspiring”:
Top Sellers !!!
10

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It’s a necessity due to the limitations of the search engine, plain and simple. If you want visibility, there is no alternative.

@EightBallAudio . Yes.Thats why i said ’ is NOT out of laziness’ . But out of experience. But in your opinion, how does this feel ? Maybe i have too much expectations but i believe that any song, even is a background music, deserves to have its own personality and uniqueness in its own way. Or maybe i’m trippin’ .

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@zigro . As morbid as it sounds i will write a funeral march and i will label it 'inspiring, uplifting, motivational, corporate. And yes. Upbeat. At 50 bpm.

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Exactly how you think it would feel. :neutral_face:

Do I get it right? If all authors follow this rule and name their tracks “inspiring corporate epic” and the customer get a search result with a list of 600 same named tracks, then you have the always wanted visibility?

And is rhis kind of visibility not exactly the point, that the customer has criticized in his post? They are tired about this lists with 600 same named items.

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Really Kafkaesque :smiley:

Nobody likes it, but that’s the only way to get any visibility at all. The search engine treats different keywords differently, so if it’s your dream to dominate “Inspiring”, “Upbeat” or any of the other A-list terms — good luck with all that; you’re better off finding an overlooked search term where new tracks debut at #1 for most relevant.

And yes, maybe customers are finally getting tired of the absurdity. Current sales trends might suggest that may well be the case.

There have been many great suggestions over the years on how to improve the situation, so if you’re curious, there are plenty of threads on the subject. The root of the problem is, AJ shares a search engine algorithm with the rest of Envato. Great for if you’re looking for a picture of a shoe or some video of a bird. Not so great when you’re trying to communicate something more abstract and emotional.

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I think there has been some research in Psychology where they monitored a group of people having to pick a candy out of say 5 different options and then again picking one from 30 displayed on a table. (I’m making the numbers up). Afterwards they evaluated and the people interacting with the smaller number were much more likely to make a choice.
The bigger portion initially attracted more people but less people actually picked something. This defies the idea that more choices are always better.
So imaging searching a track here, typing in “inspiring”. You see thousands of tracks.
Maybe you play a couple but ultimately the experience is too overwhelming I think → exit.

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