Big companies buying songs


#1

Hello everyone,

I recently heard that one of the authors of AudioJungle (don’t remember the name) sold a track to SonyMobile for Xperia commercial and thats huge:)
The question is, do companies give credit to the author in the commercial? Or they just buy the broadcasting license and don’t mention the author.

Thank you


#2

No credit 99/100 times.


#3

For commercials, because companies advertise their own product and not your music, almost definitely, no. I mean, how often do you see a film trailer or a commercial with “featuring music by Two Steps From Hell” in it? And that’s a whole different level.


#4

Here, we are all a soldiers of the invisible front :slight_smile:


#5

Sure we’re invisible, but isn’t everybody?
You don’t see “Directed by Ricky Rickerson” on a Subway Commercial. Or “Edited by Jim Jimmy-Smith” on the latest Marvel trailer.

Why should we (who didn’t even directly work on the media) get a credit?


#6

I see what you mean and it makes sense. But, here are some links from YouTube, where the company does write the authors who created the track.

  1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaaIAfLDQBY (Samsung Galaxy)
  2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M7FIvfx5J10 (Volvo Commercial)

There are many of others as well. But, if they are not royalty free, obviously they write the names and give royalties to the author.


#7

Would be nice though to get a credit:))


#8

The first credit is not given by Samsung. The second is by Enya, one of the most famous artists in the world, so it isn’t strange.

Normally, unknown production music creators do not get credit.


#9

I know its harsh for authors to get treated like that.

But looking to the other side of things, lets say, if a “company” hears a good tune on a commercial and wanted to find the artist, they will search for him, either by commenting on the video (if that is played on YouTube), or ask the company that is using his track.

I personally, dont care having my name carved on that video/commercial since the average person will not care that much either, but if someone is interested, hell know a way, or two to get that info.

So dont sweat about it that much :stuck_out_tongue:
Making good music is what keeps us alive :wink:


#11

Music Company: Echolab
Composer: Tobias Norberg
Music Producer: Gavin Little
Sound Design Company: Echolab
Sound Designers: Gavin Little , Joe McHugh
Sound Mix Company: Echolab
Mixer: Gavin Little


#12

Yes, I know there were credits but it’s not on Samsung’s YouTube channel! Someone else was nice and looked it up.

This is an official Samsung channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpzWFC43C1A - no credits.


#13

Thats true. But, someone did find it somewhere. So, i guess there is info on authors.


#14

From a non-author you can’t expect companies to promote your work if they buy it as they will be using lots of different parts in the video (song, visual effects etc) so the list of credits would be huge… but all is not lost…

Promote that your item is being used in XX commercial, write it on the item page with a link to the commercial and also on your profile page (items used by companies such as X, Y and Z).

There is more than 1 way to get promotion from a “famous sale”… you can tell people your item was used by the company, even if the company doesn’t promote it.


#15

Thanks mate.


#16

Nice point!!


#17

There’s a problem with this situation that I have experienced and been through in great depth here before…only crediting one composer, or some composers (if multi tracks are used) but not all of them, in the Credits/End Credits. Why is this a problem? I’ll tell you. Because, if we (or AdRev) ever find our music in this final product, it looks as though the composer has stolen our music and they are calling it their own. This happened to me with a video game about 6 months ago. Similarly, just recently, I found my music being used in a short film. Four contributing composers had been credited and yet, even though my music was playing over the entire End Credits, I didn’t get mentioned. Fortunately, in this instance, after contacting the director (diplomatically I hasten to add) they actually apologized and said that they would give me a credit.

The bottom line should be, if there are any credits at all in the production, then everyone involved should be credited.


#18

totally agree with you


#19

If I could get a big company to buy my music, I could care less about the credit. I just want to be heard. :smile:


#21

But if they don’t credit you, what’s the point? :frowning: