Audacity Help: Mono to Stereo?


#1

Is there a way to export Mono to Stereo?

I have some sounds “soft-rejected”, because I have Mono instead of Stereo.

Can you help me? Please?

Thanks!!


#2

The only way I know that works in Audacity is kind of convoluted and weird but here are the steps.

  1. Add a new audio track - Tracks > Add New > Audio Track

  2. Copy and paste over the mono track to the new track you just created

  3. Shift select both mono tracks by holding shift and clicking in the left margin of both tracks so both are highlighted.

  4. There will be a drop down menu with the audio files name on it in the top left corner of the track display. Click this drop down menu and select Make Stereo Track

The easiest way would be to just create an empty session in Logic/Digital Performer/Garageband whatever DAW you use and just rerecord it into stereo.


#3
bcrutchfield said

The only way I know that works in Audacity is kind of convoluted and weird but here are the steps.

  1. Add a new audio track - Tracks > Add New > Audio Track

  2. Copy and paste over the mono track to the new track you just created

  3. Shift select both mono tracks by holding shift and clicking in the left margin of both tracks so both are highlighted.

  4. There will be a drop down menu with the audio files name on it in the top left corner of the track display. Click this drop down menu and select Make Stereo Track

That did it! Thanks, mate!

bcrutchfield said

The easiest way would be to just create an empty session in Logic/Digital Performer/Garageband whatever DAW you use and just rerecord it into stereo.

I didn’t make that because they’re OLD sounds.

Anyways, thanks!

Sorry for my bad English.

StockDesignMan


#4

Other way is export the file as mp3, it gives you the option to export mono to stereo


#5

Another question!! How can I change the audio bit rate?


#6

I dont get it here ?

If you export a mono file as stereo, it will still be mono ? It’s like taking a 72dpi picture and convert in in Photoshop to 300dpi. The file information will tell you, it’s 300dpi, but in fact it is still 72dpi. Same thing if you convert a mono file into stereo, exept you would use some tools which can spread the signal by frequeny range to left and right channel.

You’re asking about converting the bitrate ? Same rule applies there, if you take a 22khz file and convert it to 44.1khz, it’s still the same. Doing things like this can be called cheating ( sorry for the rude word ), and you should avoid this to make your customers happy :slight_smile:

Hope this helps in some way.

Good luck

Daniel


#7

Well, about this “cheating”. There are specific programs or even hardware tools that can not convert audio, mono to stereo or bit rate or sample rate.

What if you recorded something with a mini disk device ? So you’ll have a 16 bit 1168 kbit/s instead of 1411.2 kbit/s (CD encoding). Is that a reason NOT to make it available on the usual formats ? Should the customers see an error message when trying to import in video project or burn a CD with “BLEEP-BLEEP UNRECOGNIZED FORMAT” ?

What if you record some nature specific sounds that require just one microphone ? Should you make the file fake stereo/ double mono or to have your file rejected ?


#8

As a software engineer and former professional game developer, I think the hard-and-fast “stereo-only” rule is short-sighted and limits AudioJungle’s market appeal. Any sound driver worth its salt will have a “pan” param, and it’s often desireable, esp. in a game, to have the programmer set this at runtime to specify where the mono sound will occur rather than having it defined in the sound itself through balancing of the two waveforms. This way, the sound effect is much more useful esp. in 3-D audio.

A stereo-only sound defeats the runtime pan setting, or require extra (and unnecessary) processing - assuming the sound driver is smart enough to do this with two waveforms (e.g. a right and a left). Also, I would never, ever use MP3s for sound effects. It’s a waste of CPU power and 44- or 96-Khz sound is just not important in most cases in games. Every cycle should be preserved for graphics and AI.

This is esp. true with the little sound-effect type sounds that comprise the bulk of AudioJungle’s offerings…

Just my $1.92 on the matter…

Scott, you out there?


#9
ecital said

It’s a waste of CPU power and 44- or 96-Khz sound is just not important in most cases in games. Every cycle should be preserved for graphics and AI.

This is a slightly misleading statement. In flash / handheld games you’re right, but it’s absolutely not the case on projects of a bigger scope. It does depend on the sound effect of course.

But as for the Mono-Stereo thing. I 100% agree. Mono sound files should be permitted.


#10

Yes, I realize, Gareth, that it’s simplistic. It’s a lowest-common-denominator statement.

Even when I was developing games the consoles did have separate sound RAM and a separate sound CPU, thus abrogating any bus impact of audio throughput on main bus processing.

However, the bulk of my statement stands: If I have a bird tweet sound, I don’t want the sound engineer to decide for me whether it will pan to the left, right, center, and I don’t want the extra step of having to convert it to mono. That’s to be decided programmatically at runtime depending on the relative position of the sound.

You obviously understand all of this, being deeply embedded in the industry. I wish the AJ policies would be appropriately amended - not for my own benefit per se but for others’.


#11
Mihai_Sorohan said

Well, about this “cheating”. There are specific programs or even hardware tools that can not convert audio, mono to stereo or bit rate or sample rate.

What if you recorded something with a mini disk device ? So you’ll have a 16 bit 1168 kbit/s instead of 1411.2 kbit/s (CD encoding). Is that a reason NOT to make it available on the usual formats ? Should the customers see an error message when trying to import in video project or burn a CD with “BLEEP-BLEEP UNRECOGNIZED FORMAT” ?

What if you record some nature specific sounds that require just one microphone ? Should you make the file fake stereo/ double mono or to have your file rejected ?

You are right Mihai. Maybe i explained / wrote it a bit wrong. What i wanted to say is only, that you should not convert stuff to higher resolution just to have a " high quality file". Some people take 128k mp3 and reconvert them to wav and put it online that way :slight_smile:

I personaly think, mono files are fine if the recorded source is also mono. But then AJ should allow mono files as well, it does not make much sense if people start to convert mono files into “fake” stereo, just to fulfill the rules.


#12

Got your point SonicCube. Practically we are on the same boat :slight_smile:

You can make a “fake stereo” not only by making a dual mono, but also by adding some stereo enhancers (ADT, Voxengo Stereo Touch, QuikQuak UpStereo) or some very good quality reverb (some IR of real spaces).


#13

I too had problem converting mono tracks into stereo tracks. I searched on internet for slution to this problem when I found this post http://forums.techarena.in/windows-software/1457413.htm#post5587652 It helped me. You too can try the solution given here.


#14
SonicCube said

I personaly think, mono files are fine if the recorded source is also mono. But then AJ should allow mono files as well, it does not make much sense if people start to convert mono files into “fake” stereo, just to fulfill the rules.

In my portfolio you’ll find some sfx that are “fake” stereo. In a previous post I suggested that this was due to Audiojungle’s focus on music and not sound effects. It doesn’t make much sense but would you rather see people putting of uploading their mono files due to AJ’s lack of options?