AdRev goodbye


#1

AdRev has been such a hassle I plan on deleting my account, has anyone had experience closing there AdRev account? I do not see a delete button.

Thanks,
Mike


#2

Why don’t you contact them?


#3
ToivoMedia said

Why don’t you contact them?

Yeah, I just sent them an email.


#4
mlamanna said

AdRev has been such a hassle I plan on deleting my account, has anyone had experience closing there AdRev account? I do not see a delete button.

Thanks,
Mike

I’m quite curious to know what kind of hassle you’ve been having? Hassle with AdRev themselves or with customers asking about claims?


#5
AlumoAudio said
mlamanna said

AdRev has been such a hassle I plan on deleting my account, has anyone had experience closing there AdRev account? I do not see a delete button.

Thanks,
Mike

I’m quite curious to know what kind of hassle you’ve been having? Hassle with AdRev themselves or with customers asking about claims?

Its with customers complaining about the hassle of the copyright claim on youtube, and now with the new envato blog that was posted here:


#6
mlamanna said
AlumoAudio said
mlamanna said

AdRev has been such a hassle I plan on deleting my account, has anyone had experience closing there AdRev account? I do not see a delete button.

Thanks,
Mike

I’m quite curious to know what kind of hassle you’ve been having? Hassle with AdRev themselves or with customers asking about claims?

Its with customers complaining about the hassle of the copyright claim on youtube, and now with the new envato blog that was posted here:

Right. To be frank, YouTube and matters of copyright have been around since it’s inception, but like it or not, it’s only recently YouTube has greatly stepped up it’s requirement for it’s users to prove that they have the rights to use third party copyrighted material in their videos with Licenses/permission, before they will allow monetization. Users now have to address this anyway. Envato’s decision to make this clear to buyers is just them responding to that and authors AND buyers alike will need to adapt to these changes. That’s the evolution of the Internet I’m afraid.

Also, by removing your music from being tracked on YouTube will now leave it wide open to blatant theft and reuse without your permission or Licenses even being purchased as a result of you informing the user. Of course that’s entirely up to you, but not good business practice in my eyes and potentially adding to the continued devaluation of music as an asset. If you view having to engage with your customers as ‘a hassle’, then maybe selling via an online, public marketplaces isn’t the most ideal option.

Look at it this way, I’ve sold many tens of thousands of licenses of my AdRev registered music over the past few years, and never once felt having to speak with the very occasional buyer that asks about it, as being a hassle. Far from it. It’s an opportunity to directly communicate with a buyer and reassure them that as a genuine License holder, they can use it via the AdRev claim removal page and even eligible for their channel to be whitelisted. These buyers are often very grateful for my help, get a heightened sense of value and I’ve lost count of the times they have returned to purchase more Licenses from me, generating repeat business.

Just have a think about it, before throwing the baby out with the bathwater! :slight_smile:


#7

AlumoAudio

Very good point and something I will consider before making my final decision, thanks for the great input :slight_smile:


#8
AlumoAudio said
mlamanna said
AlumoAudio said
mlamanna said

AdRev has been such a hassle I plan on deleting my account, has anyone had experience closing there AdRev account? I do not see a delete button.

Thanks,
Mike

I’m quite curious to know what kind of hassle you’ve been having? Hassle with AdRev themselves or with customers asking about claims?

Its with customers complaining about the hassle of the copyright claim on youtube, and now with the new envato blog that was posted here:

Right. To be frank, YouTube and matters of copyright have been around since it’s inception, but like it or not, it’s only recently YouTube has greatly stepped up it’s requirement for it’s users to prove that they have the rights to use third party copyrighted material in their videos with Licenses/permission, before they will allow monetization. Users now have to address this anyway. Envato’s decision to make this clear to buyers is just them responding to that and authors AND buyers alike will need to adapt to these changes. That’s the evolution of the Internet I’m afraid.

Also, by removing your music from being tracked on YouTube will now leave it wide open to blatant theft and reuse without your permission or Licenses even being purchased as a result of you informing the user. Of course that’s entirely up to you, but not good business practice in my eyes and potentially adding to the continued devaluation of music as an asset. If you view having to engage with your customers as ‘a hassle’, then maybe selling via an online, public marketplaces isn’t the most ideal option.

Look at it this way, I’ve sold many tens of thousands of licenses of my AdRev registered music over the past few years, and never once felt having to speak with the very occasional buyer that asks about it, as being a hassle. Far from it. It’s an opportunity to directly communicate with a buyer and reassure them that as a genuine License holder, they can use it via the AdRev claim removal page and even eligible for their channel to be whitelisted. These buyers are often very grateful for my help, get a heightened sense of value and I’ve lost count of the times they have returned to purchase more Licenses from me, generating repeat business.

Just have a think about it, before throwing the baby out with the bathwater! :slight_smile:

I already registered 14 tracks with this service but i still can’t figure out what is the difference between YTkey and ContentID and when i do search at the pages, the only thing i see is “How it works” nothing in here, look at the FAQ nothing too, did i miss something?


#9

YTkey is to release music to youtube’s new music channel thats in the works.
ContentID is for videos using your music.


#10
soundgridmedia said

I already registered 14 tracks with this service but i still can’t figure out what is the difference between YTkey and ContentID and when i do search at the pages, the only thing i see is “How it works” nothing in here, look at the FAQ nothing too, did i miss something?

Ok, so submitting your music via AdRev’s ContentID tab just ingests your music into the YouTube ContentID system, as normal, to be tracked across YouTube. Any revenue earned is via the on-video ads on YouTube videos that contain your music.

With YT Music Key, revenue is earned via a proportion of subscription fees from paying YT Music Key service customers.

When someone signs up to this service, the user can watch music videos on YouTube without seeing any on-screen advertising and has access to music streaming via Google Play Music (Google’s version of Spotify).

AdRev have added the option for artists to add their full ‘albums’, including artwork, so these can be placed within the service and artwork shown on devices when played. For the most part, I shouldn’t imagine many royalty free composers using this option, but it’s there if we need it!

Edit: @Mike Just got there before me! And a much less long winded answer than mine! lol :slight_smile:


#11

thanks mlamanna and AlumoAudio for the explaination… now it’s clear why i must add the album cover for that. :slight_smile:


#12

Has anyone noticed a drop in sales since including the new notification of youtube content ID?